The U.S. embassy is seeking an American (preferably someone with teaching or project design/lead background) to serve as the coordinator for an interesting initiative. This initiative aims to promote public service to university students through a training and a project pitch competition. We hope to create the first-ever model curriculum for creating and carrying out a public/community project for Mongolian youth.

The description of the initiative is below, and we wanted to ask your assistance in distributing the word out to potential applicants and finding a good fit for this position. Interested people should send me the following by June 26, 2016:

  1. CV/resume
  2. A brief (one-paragraph) statement of interest

In brief, the coordinator will have the following main duties (see more details below)

  • AugustSeptember: Curriculum creation and completion, recruitment of American mentors: the coordinator will design a curriculum that trains university-aged students to develop strategic, purposeful and well-planned public service engagements. The curriculum will guide student project organizers to plan public service engagements by applying basic best practices of project management for project conception.
  • Another main duty of the coordinator will be to find and recruit American mentors who will assemble and lead student teams and help them to initiate and implement a community service project. These Americans can be Peace Corps volunteers. In general, it is preferred if the mentors have ready access to academic communities.
  • October: Curriculum designer trains American mentors @AC: delivers a one-afternoon workshop training for American mentors.

 The embassy will provide a total of $2,000 for all of the above-mentioned services of the coordinator.

 Further details:

 —-

  1. Activity Title

Students for Service: Building Public Service and Volunteerism Capacity in Mongolian Universities

 1.Two sentence elevator pitch

Just over twenty-five years after its decision for democracy, Mongolian civil society includes many students motivated to improve Mongolian society through public service. “Students for Service” empowers university students to innovate and execute purposeful projects to advance continued democratic development. 

  1. Brief description of activity that clearly outlines anticipated outcomes and impact and includes an explanation of how the activity addresses one of the three areas cited above

“Students for Service” is a three-stage initiative that includes creation of a comprehensive curriculum to teach skills and strategies to enable public service project conception and implementation, delivery of training to mentors who will cooperate with students at local host institutions, and engagement from target Mongolian audiences through a pitch competition and project implementation.

During the first stage, the Embassy will recruit an American teacher in Mongolia to create a curriculum that trains university-aged students to develop strategic, purposeful and well-planned public service engagements. The curriculum will guide student project organizers to plan public service engagements by applying basic best practices of project management for project conception. It will enable students to understand the steps necessary to shepherd a project through its implementation phase by including real-life examples of public service projects previously organized by secondary institutions in the U.S., as well as a planning template to support first-time organizers. For learners who may be already and successful with applying these processes, an enrichment component will teaches how to develop monitoring and evaluation plans for projects.

In the second phase, the curriculum designer delivers a one-afternoon workshop training for American mentors. The training will occur at the American Corner and the mentor trainees will be comprised of a cohort of Americans studying, interning, or teaching at local university institutions— to include Peace Corps volunteers who are teaching older secondary-aged students (juniors or seniors). Since over half of Mongolia’s population resides in the capital city of Ulaanbaatar, the bulk of the in-person components of this initiative will be concentrated in Ulaanbaatar. However, this training will be taped and amplified on the Embassy website and social media channels as part of a separate, Embassy-driven digital outreach campaign to highlight key points of different phases and to promote nationwide reach.

During the third phase, American mentors will train students at their local institutions and mentor students to design one group project, with a budget limit of $500, that aims to create a public service opportunity related to specific areas aligned to mission goals drawn from Post’s ICS, such as environment, disability rights, gender equity, and entrepreneurship. Mentors and student leaders will present their proposals at an Embassy-hosted pitch competition and select exemplary projects to fund; participation by institutions based outside of UB will be enabled through DVC. After projects are implemented, Post will host a reception to highlight grantees’ project outcomes. To complement the reception presentation and further engage public interest in topics addressed by these projects, Post’s press-media team will highlight the goals and outcomes through a social media outreach campaign.

 Ultimately, “Students for Service” engages Americans studying and teaching abroad in meaningful and authentic ways by developing their project management skills, empowering them to teach these newly acquired skills, and sharing their own personal public service experiences. Capacity-building is doubly attained through the engagement of American participants at all stages to share these skills with Mongolian students, as well as for Mongolian students to apply skills by designing and implementing projects. These project outcomes are sustainable over the long-term because the curriculum can be shared and reused by Post. Phases 2 and 3 of “Students for Service” can be replicated annually by local staff or Post’s partners (e.g., Mongolian alumni of USG programs, Fulbright ETAs, Peace Corps volunteers, other NGOs, etc.) in coordination with administration of existing Embassy grants funding. 

  1. Start and end dates of activity

This project begins in July of 2016 and concludes in January 2017. Key activities will fall as follows:

  • July: Recruit American university instructor for workshop curriculum creation & American mentor recruitment (w/Embassy support to connect to PC, Fulbright ETAs, contacts)
  • AugustSeptember: Curriculum creation and completion, recruitment of American mentors
  • October: Curriculum designer trains American mentors @AC
  • November: Project design with students at partner institutions; pitch competition @AC
  • December-January: Project execution at selected institutions; “Students for Service” reception @AC